Dear all,

Feng Cheng, Christian Zeeden, Stef Kaboth-Bahr and I are organizing a Goldschmidt2020 meeting session entitled "Climate Forcing: From Tectonic and Orbital Processes to Extreme Climate Transients (14k)". 
Our session aims to provide a platform for discussing important discoveries in climate forcing. We welcome you to present your research at our session (https://goldschmidt.info/2020/program/programViewThemes#session_480_4567).
 
The meeting will take place in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, on June 21-26, 2020. Please ensure that you have submitted your abstract by February 21, 2020. Full instructions and the abstract submission form can be found online. https://goldschmidt.info/2020/abstracts

Best Greetings,

Mingsong,
 
Also on behalf of Feng, Christian, and Stefanie
 
 

14k: Climate Forcing: From Tectonic and Orbital Processes to Extreme Climate Transients

Keynote: Timothy Herbert (Brown University)

Title:   Climate Forcing: From Tectonic and Orbital Processes to Extreme Climate Transients (14k).
Abstract:    Earth’s climate system has experienced countless striking changes, varying between extremes of clod with massive continental ice-sheets and extremes of warmth with ice-free poles. It is widely acknowledged that Earth’s orbital processes have paced long-term climate variations. Meanwhile, tectonic-forced boundary condition changes, e.g., the India-Asia collision and uplift of the Tibetan Plateau, the closure of the Central American Seaway, and the opening of the two Antarctic getaways, have also triggered major shifts in the global climate system. As we continue to develop globally distributed records high-resolution, questions emerge concerning the pacing of various features of the climate system. The astronomical theory of climate change, pioneered by Milutin Milankovitch, connects variations in Earth’s orbit to glacial-interglacial cycles. Studies of the astronomical theory have led to the established tool of cyclostratigraphy allowing for high-resolution geological time scales and an understanding of insolation driven mechanisms for past climate change. This session focuses on both external and internal climate forcing ranging from tectonic processes on time scales of 10^6-10^7 years and astronomical processes with 10^6-10^4-yr cycles to extreme climate transients with durations of 10^3-10^5 years, bringing together proxy-based, theoretical and/or modeling studies about global and regional paleoclimate.


You may also like

Back to Top